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The Shape of Diamonds

Diamond stones

When you select a diamond, you expect it to last a lifetime. You want to love and cherish it forever. That’s why it’s important to know the choices to you have when selecting the perfect one. While many shapes have been around for generations, but every so often a new shape appears. Here are the most popular classic and newer shape of diamonds.

Round Cut  Diamond Shapes

The round (brilliant) diamond is probably the oldest diamond shape, being around for centuries. Even today you’ll find it to be a very popular stone, with fire and brilliance that is dazzling. It’s the most popular shape for the new “halo” diamond engagement rings.

Oval Cut  Diamond Shapes

An oval diamond has beautiful brilliance that’s similar to a round diamond. Oval diamonds are also very popular as their length can accentuate long, slender fingers.

Pear Cut Shape of diamonds

This brilliant-cut diamond is also called a teardrop for its single point and rounded end. The unique look of the pear shape helps make it a popular choice for a variety of diamond jewelry, not just rings. If you choose an elongated pear shape, the length of the diamond creates a subtle slimming effect on the fingers, similar to the oval.

 Heart-Shaped  Diamond shapes

The heart is the ultimate symbol of love. The unique look of the heart-shaped diamond helps make it a distinctive not just for a ring, but almost any type of jewelry.   The Heart shape is available in several length-to-width ratios, creating a rounder or longer heart shape. The choice is yours.

Marquise-Cut  Shape of diamonds

The shape of a marquise diamond can maximize carat weight, giving you a much larger-looking diamond. This brilliant-cut diamond looks beautiful set with round or pear-shaped side stones, and the length of the marquise diamond makes fingers appear long and slender.

Radiant-Cut Diamond shapes 

Trimmed corners are the way to identify the radiant-cut diamond.  A radiant-cut looks equally beautiful set with either baguette or round side-diamonds. Radiant-cut diamonds can vary in their degree of rectangularity.  Have your jeweler show you different types so you can select the one you prefer. That’s a good idea with all the diamonds.

Cushion-Cut Diamond Shapes 

This unique shape has been popular for more than a century. Cushion-cut diamonds (also known as “pillow-cut” diamonds) have rounded corners and larger facets to increase their brilliance. These larger facets highlight the diamond’s clarity, so be sure to review the clarity plot on the diamond certificate. Cushion-cut diamonds are available in shapes ranging from square to rectangular.

Emerald-Cut/Asscher  Diamond shapes Shape of diamonds

What makes the emerald diamond shape different is its pavilion, which is cut with rectangular facets to create a unique optical appearance. Due to its larger, open table, this shape highlights the clarity of a diamond. Also, emerald-cut diamonds can vary greatly in how rectangular they are. If you’d prefer an emerald cut with a squared outline, look for an Asscher-cut diamond.

Princess Cut   

The Princess is a square cut diamond. Today, the Princess cut is as popular among brides as the round diamond.

Whichever diamond shape you choose, they will never lose their shape.

There’s a song from an old movie (Gentlemen Prefer Blondes) that has a line, “pear shaped or square shaped, these rocks won’t lose their shape…diamonds are a girl’s best friend.” Indeed they are. If you’re in doubt about whether a diamond is right for you, check out the best source of information about diamonds and other gemstones at the Gemological Society of America.

Check out Regency’s collection of diamond rings. And, please sign up for our blog. You’ll become a more knowledgeable jewelry buyer or collector. Go to our home page and submit the sign up form.

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April Birthstone: All about diamonds

two rows diamond Eternity Ring

The history of the April Birthstone: Diamonds

Before we delve into the April birthstone, let’s consider “who the heck created birthstones?” Well, it was too long ago to consider it a ploy to generate more business.  The origin of birthstones is believed to date back to the breastplate of  (Biblical) Aaron which contained twelve gemstones representing the twelve tribes of Israel. As time wore on, the 12 gems became associated with the zodiac and the months connected to it.

Aaron started the tradition of wearing a colored stone each month as a sort of good luck charm. Initially people wore all twelve stones, rotating according to season. The current list dates back to 1912 with only one addition since then – the Tanzanite was added to December.

The Chronology of diamonds

Diamonds have been around as long as mankind. Diamonds have a long history as beautiful objects of desire. In the first century AD, the Roman naturalist Pliny stated: “Diamond is the most valuable, not only of precious stones, but of all things in this world.”
 

The world’s love of diamonds had its start in India, where diamonds were gathered from the country’s rivers and streams. Some historians estimate that India was trading in diamonds as early as the fourth century BC.  Gradually, though, this changed. Indian diamonds found their way, along with other exotic merchandise, to Western Europe in the caravans that traveled to Venice’s medieval markets. By the 1400s, diamonds were becoming fashionable accessories for Europe’s elite.

Things changed in the 1700’s

In the early 1700s, as India’s diamond supplies began to decline, Brazil emerged as an important source. Diamonds were discovered in the pans of gold miners as they sifted through the gravels of local rivers. Once it reached its full potential, Brazil dominated the diamond market for more than 150 years.

The story of the modern diamond market really begins on the African continent, with the 1866 discovery of diamonds in Kimberley, South Africa. Entrepreneur Cecil Rhodes established De Beers Consolidated Mines Limited 22 years later, in 1888. By 1900, De Beers, through its mines in South Africa, controlled an estimated 90 percent of the world’s production of rough diamonds. Today, South Africa accounts for a much smaller percentage of diamond production. In fact, production is spread all over Africa and many countries in the world.

The lore of diamonds… 

Getting back to the April birthstone, diamonds have been admired for centuries; some historians estimate it was traded as early as 4 BC. Before man understood diamonds were produced under earth’s surface and pushed to the top, many ancient civilizations believed that diamonds were lighting made real on earth. Perhaps this is the reason that diamonds have often been associated with great healing powers. Many thought the diamond could cure brain disease, alleviate pituitary gland disorders and draw toxins from the blood. But there’s more…

The Healing Powers of Diamonds. 

During the Middle Ages, diamonds were thought to hold healing powers and to cure ailments stemming from the pituitary gland and brain. By heating the crystal and taking it to bed, it was thought to draw out the harmful toxins that were crippling the body.

It was also believed that diamonds could have an effect on an individual’s balance and clarity and could boost their energy when combined with other crystals like amethyst.

The diamond as the April gemstone has garnered the hearts of many and is the most coveted crystal to date. Deemed as the “King of all Birthstones,” diamonds make the ideal choice for an April birthday gift. And, diamonds were beloved by the ancient aristocracy..;

Historically, the diamond first became a popular gemstone in India, when the Moghuls and Imperial Colony easily mined diamonds from deposits along three major rivers. Today, the diamond is most widely known as the stone to give as part of an engagement ring.

Diamonds: A variety of colors. Often called Fancy Diamonds. Adopted from the Greek work adamas, meaning “invincible,” diamonds come in a wide range of colors such as black, blue, green, pink, red, purple, orange and yellow. The color is dependent upon the type of impurities that are present in the stone. For instance, yellow stones have minuscule traces of nitrogen while blue ones contain boron. The planet’s most valued gems are fancy color diamonds. Only one in 10,000 diamonds has a fancy color. Red, green, purple, and orange are generally the most rare, followed by pink and blue. Yellows and browns are the most common fancy colors, but they’re generally less valuable than the rarer colors. To learn more about diamonds, check out Gemological Institute of America.

With fancy color diamonds, their value generally increases with the strength and purity of the color. Large, vivid fancy color diamonds are extremely rare and very valuable. However, many fancy diamond colors are muted rather than pure and strong. Blacks, grays, and fancy whites are considered fancies, too. Some have been fashioned into gems. The 67.50-carat Black Orloff diamond, named after the Russian Princess Nadia Vyegin-Orloff, is the most well-known example. It’s shown here.